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Preboarding...way out of control

jphw
New Arrival

Does anyone else see this keep getting worse and worse and worse?

Last few weeks:

  Ticket A1 - on three occasions, never found an aisle before 4... last one was Row 6 

  Flight from MDW to CMH - counted 13 preboarders

  Very rarely is a preboarder demonstrating any kind of "disability"

 

 

 

27 REPLIES 27

Re: Preboarding...way out of control

TheMiddleSeat
Rising Star

Are you certain that those passengers were not through passengers staying on board from the incoming flight? Did you actually see all of them board as preboarders? And to say it again, not every disability is visible.

 

--TheMiddleSeat

Re: Preboarding...way out of control

Actnashville
New Arrival

I can picture you standing off to the side watching pre-boarders in “seemingly good health” board the plane because of their “disability”, face red and blood boiling because you are getting so upset over not getting to sit closer to the front of the plane.

 

People with true hidden disabilities feel shame and embarrassment everytime they fly because of people like you. I’m not saying that there aren’t people who take advantage of pre board, but it seems like you have already decided that if someone appears to be in good health, they are faking it. You should try to calm down and take some time to educate yourself on what a hidden disability is before getting yourself all worked up next time you fly. Living a life with prejudice and resentment is no way to live.

Re: Preboarding...way out of control

spacecoastbill
Active Member

Seeing people lug their oversize heavy carry on bags to the gate, then walking around to restaurants and other things in the terminal only to return to the gate shortly before boarding and sit in a wheelchair is a clue.

 

These same people heft the bags into the overhead and on arrival pull them down, run to the baggage claim, heft their large suitcases from the baggage belt then run to a taxi.....Visibly nothing wrong with them, and they have also demonstrated it.

 

But instead of paying for the priority boarding all you have to do is claim a need to preboard.

 

SWA seems to have the most preboarders os any airline.

 

The only way to curb it is assigned seating.  

Re: Preboarding...way out of control

rtbarron
Active Member

@spacecoastbill
As has been discussed on every other post about alleged pre-board abuse, not all disabilities are visible. Many healthy-looking people have legitimate disabilities which require them to pre-board. As an example, what if the person lugging the oversize heavy bag has a condition that requires them to have immediate access to the lavatory several times during a flight. Wouldn't it be best for all of the other passengers on the plane if that passenger sat in an aisle seat? I have no doubt that some passengers abuse the pre-board policy, but it's not as many as you think.

Southwest has had an open-seating policy for its entire 47-year history, and all but three or four of those years have been profitable. They have no incentive to change their seating policy. Open seating ensures that Customers board quickly rather than waiting in the gate area until the last minute. When passengers board quickly, flights leave on-time and arrive on-time. On-time performance is far more important to Customers than assigned seats.

Re: Preboarding...way out of control

bmbw727
New Arrival

I can't believe what I'm reading. The concept that every disability is obvious and visable is clearly an idea adopted by blessed individuals who have no clue what it's like to have a chronic illness. Believe it or not, we have good days, and many bad ones. Bad days you don't wish on anyone, not even the ones looking at you questioning whether you're "faking" it. I am young, just shy of 40 yrs old, and look even younger. My "invisible" illness has kept me from taking a plane for 3 years to visit my sister. On the day I decide I am ready to go, I now have to worry about someone giving me a deathstare because I appear to be "normal."

Re: Preboarding...way out of control

dcatlin
New Arrival

Agree, some disabilities cannot be seen but I am in agreement, it has gotten out of control.  Just this weekend I experienced the same thing and the same feelings.  2 older women went thru security just in front of me and proceeded to walk the same path as me to the same gate.  Being near these women for 30+ minutes I clearly noticed them over and over.  When prompted to board I was business class A1 and they lines up as pre-board right in front of where I was standing.  I could also see one of their boarding passes which read C-13.  Their fare was substantially cheaper than mine, no heavy bags, they were not "physically" inable but they worked the system.  The problem in our world is too many people lack the humanitarian trait, they only care about themselves.  My father is 65 and handicap, has Spinobifida and one prostetic leg but he DOES NOT pre-board because he is physically able and also doesnt use handicap parking..."it should be reserved for people who really need it".

Re: Preboarding...way out of control

dfwskier
Rising Star

You start out saying that some disabilities are unseen, and then complain about the two women. Are you certain that they had no unseen disabilities?

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Re: Preboarding...way out of control

dcatlin
New Arrival

They had no visible physical inabilities and that I think is the difference infact they seemed quite the opposite.  They walked briskly a quarter mile to their gate.  If they can do that without assistance what reason do they really have to get on the plane first, especially when they bought the cheapest fare possible putting them in C boarding.  A humanitarian that is aware of their unseen disability that perhaps, cant stand for too long, or needs an aisle seat to get up often can easily buy the Wanna Get Away fare and either A. pay $15 for Early Bird OR  B. ask the agent at the gate if the flight is full and pay a small fee to upgrade if needed.  A person who can barely walk, arrives in a chair, or has other serious "physical inabilities" should absolutely pre-board.

Re: Preboarding...way out of control

TheMiddleSeat
Rising Star

@dcatlin wrote:

They walked briskly a quarter mile to their gate.  If they can do that without assistance what reason do they really have to get on the plane first


Seriously? This is awful. Can we please stop trying to diagnose everyone else's disabilities and limitations? You also have no idea what they paid for the flight. A last minute Anytime fare could be more expensive than a BS ticket purchased in advance and could get a C boarding position. Or maybe they're making a connection and paid 3 times the price for their trip. Not that what you or they paid for the flight matters. The point is that none of us know anything about another person or their situation so we shouldn't be making judgements. 

 

--TheMiddleSeat