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Preboarding Scammers

Dumpsterbaby
New Arrival

To deter preboaridng scammers and make business passengers happy, implement this rule: preboarding passengers cannot sit in the first 3 rows and the emergency exit row.

if a PP needs to sit next to the restroom, the 4th row is definitely close enough.

37 REPLIES 37

Re: Preboarding Scammers

Anelese7
New Arrival

 And how exactly would that help people with wheel chairs or  people like me who need the first row to prevent claustrophobia  triggering panic attacks ? 

Re: Preboarding Scammers

Dkasp
New Arrival

Buy an upgraded ticket.  Easy.

Re: Preboarding Scammers

tpegan1
New Arrival

It seems to me that Southwest is trying to give preferential treatment to a lot of groups, disabled, military, families, e.g.  The problem is that it is a net sum game.  You cannot give preferential treatment to one group without it being at the expense of another group.  The business traveller is the least compelling even though I believe it is Southwest's bread and butter.   I'm a frequent business traveller who wouldn't be flying Southwest if it wasn't dictated by my company.  

Re: Preboarding Scammers

chgoflyer
Top Contributor
Solution

@tpegan1 wrote:

It seems to me that Southwest is trying to give preferential treatment to a lot of groups, disabled, military, families, e.g.  The problem is that it is a net sum game.  You cannot give preferential treatment to one group without it being at the expense of another group.  The business traveller is the least compelling even though I believe it is Southwest's bread and butter.   I'm a frequent business traveller who wouldn't be flying Southwest if it wasn't dictated by my company.  


Sounds like, from some of the many posts you've made recently, that maybe you're confused about some aspects of the boarding system in Southwest. 

 

In order to be compliant with the Air Carrier Access Act, disabled passengers are allowed to preboard. It's not "preferential treatment," it's not a favor or privilege being granted. It's required by law to ensure the disabled receive the proper seating needed.

 

Military members (in uniform only, a significant limitation that disappoints many in the services) and Families (a parent with a child age 6 and under) are allowed to board after the A group, before the B one. This could be seen as a special advantage, but it's worth noting that most military members do not qualify, and this "advantage" happens only after at least 60 people have already boarded the plane.

 

Business Travelers flying on a Business Select fare are given preferential treatment, guaranteeing an A1-15 boarding position. Southwest's frequent flyers ("A-List" and "A-List Preferred") also receive preferential treatment, receiving boarding positions beginning with A-16. Both board ahead of military or families.

 

Additionally, if a business traveler isn't on a BS fare or an A-List member, they may purchase EarlyBird Check-In or Upgraded Boarding to ensure an early boarding position.

 

 

 

Re: Preboarding Scammers

jamespatton22
New Arrival

Unfortunately like everything else there are those that exploit the loopholes and those who follow the rules and pay extra for the business select tickets suffer. Every flight on SWA I take now (and I fly constantly) there are individuals in the preboard group that appear to have no reason for being there. They appear young, fit, able to stand and walk and have no special needs or items like service dogs or mobility devices. They stand in the preboard line for long periods to make sure they get on first while playing on or talking on their phones. The open seating policy and ease of asking for and getting a preboard assignment lets those who did not pay for business select and usually have a group C boarding group assignment to jump to the front. I have been business select A1 or A2 position and by the time I was able to board I had to sit in row 5 or greater after all the preboard people. Most are half my age and more fit than me. I have watched many literally take off running in the airport after we got off the plane.  

Re: Preboarding Scammers

dfwskier
Rising Star

@jamespatton22 wrote:

Unfortunately like everything else there are those that exploit the loopholes and those who follow the rules and pay extra for the business select tickets suffer. Every flight on SWA I take now (and I fly constantly) there are individuals in the preboard group that appear to have no reason for being there. They appear young, fit, able to stand and walk and have no special needs or items like service dogs or mobility devices. They stand in the preboard line for long periods to make sure they get on first while playing on or talking on their phones. The open seating policy and ease of asking for and getting a preboard assignment lets those who did not pay for business select and usually have a group C boarding group assignment to jump to the front. I have been business select A1 or A2 position and by the time I was able to board I had to sit in row 5 or greater after all the preboard people. Most are half my age and more fit than me. I have watched many literally take off running in the airport after we got off the plane.  


As has been said many times here, people that NEED to preboard becasue they have needs for specific seats do not necessarily look disabled.

 

Here's a real example from a person who posted here a few weeks ago. The person needed a window seat because of a propensity to vomit if unable to acutally see what was happening to the plane. The person appeared normal - no limp, no wheel chair, no apparent diability.The person was askng if she should preboard. People that responded said YES.

 

Would you want the airline to deny that person a reasonable chance at a window seat, only to have the person sit nevt to you and vomit on you instead?

Re: Preboarding Scammers

Dkasp
New Arrival

They can buy an upgraded ticket just like I do.

Re: Preboarding Scammers

HauseofMouse
New Arrival

FYI, Preboarders are not allowed to sit in the emergency exit row.  HOWEVER, Preboarders may have a significant need to sit in the bulkhead seats and the ACAA  specifically states that they cannot force the disabled to sit or not sit in particular seats unless it affects the safety (i.e.  they cannot perform the tasks necessary for sitting in the emergency exit row.)  So trying to force the disabled to not sit in the first rows is not going to happen.  

Re: Preboarding Scammers

davesacenet
New Arrival

So, if a preboarder has a "significant need" to sit in a bulkhead seat on a traditional airline, do they simply select the first available first, business class or economy comfort seat they see? Of course not, as those seats have already been purchased by another. So just because Southwest has "open seating" why can't they simply identify the first-row seat as "Business Select" reserved for those who have paid the fare?
I have no problems whatsoever with preboarders be they physically or mentally disabled, military, old or young, claustrophopic or apt to vomit in other than a window seat. I do, however have a real issue paying over $800 for business class select, holding A1 and A2 and having to walk past the first several rows filled with folks who could just as easily sit in other seats (as they would have in most any other airline).