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Re: Service animals and ESA dogs

llm0403
New Arrival

There are many reasonable health questions asked.  Since the number of dogs/other animals

on planes has been increasing in the last few years , I think the FAA which is responsible for

the regulations with specific regulatiions allowed to be decided upon by the individual airlines

should be reviewed on a annual basis.

 

For further information you may want to visit:

 

https://www.faa.gov/about/initiatives/cabin_safety/pets_faq/

 

At the end of this link there are other sites suggested.

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Re: Service animals and ESA dogs

annieplawrence
New Arrival

thats because these were fake service dogs. people think they can buy a vest online and slap it on their dog and buy a "certification" (which is fake - there is no such thing as a certification for a service dog) and take them wherever they want. NO. this is not okay. true service dogs are to be trained not only to be unseen and unheard, but to be desensitived to tail pulling - meaning that if your child did actually pull their tale - they would ignore it and not react in any way.  it is something that is important for people to be educated on because those with fake service dogs or those who claim esas are service dogs (they are not!) are a terrible and bad representation for real service dogs.

 

im sorry that this happened to you, that those service dogs were fake, and that no one has gotten back to you.

Re: Service animals and ESA dogs

Laurenk
New Arrival

You are wrong about ESAs. Some of the things you said are true, but your overall point is incorrect. ESAs aren’t fake service animals because they aren’t service animals, nor are they an attempt to be a service animal. Service animals must be trained to do a task; ESAs are for emotional support so they aren’t required to perform any certain task. ESA is a legitimate option for being with disabilities. You cannot simply purchase a vest and/or certificate online and have your pet magically turn into an ESA. You must be evaluated and have a report or letter from a licensed medical professional stating you have a disability based on criteria listed in the DSM and require an ESA. If you have that, then you are allowed to call your animal an ESA which provides protections and rights in regards to housing and flights.

Re: Service animals and ESA dogs

hildababe1917
New Arrival

My husband and I are both disabled and have a Service dog. We only fly Southwest. This is the the best Airlines. 

If you have a Service dog you will not be asked to prove anything.   But, lately I have been finding that people say their dog is Service dog and it is not.

Service Dogs, true Service dogs are not allowed to bark, sniff people, whine, or wander around the plane.

I feel some people just do not want to leave their dogs at home so they state that they are Service dog.  That to me is a total injustice.  My Service dog who was fully trained and I paid a great deal of money for this. So if you want your dog to be a Service dog go through the proper channels to have it trained properly.

You make people who are truly disabled disgusted. Grow up and get a life.

 

Re: Service animals and ESA dogs

annieplawrence
New Arrival

AMEN to this. thanks for saying this. also everyone needs to know that having a real legitimate service dog does not mean buying a vest and a certification (which is fake!) online. its illegal to do so and sends a horrible representation for the rest of us with service dogs.

Re: Service animals and ESA dogs

rnchick74
New Arrival

"Service Dogs, true Service dogs are not allowed to bark, sniff people, whine, or wander around the plane.

I feel some people just do not want to leave their dogs at home so they state that they are Service dog.  "

 

That's not entirely true about REAL service dog's either...some are trained to sniff other people as part of their service. Mine sniffs other people to tell if my smells are abnormal & can then tell me if I need to take medication. Think of it this way - when you wear perfume, after a few hours you can't smell it anymore. When a service dog who uses scent for medical alert is around the person who they smell all the time, sometimes they need to sample another scent to reset their nose. A trained service dog might smell someone else momentarily but the handler can also call them off quickly and discretely. Most of the time someone being smelled might not even notice it. They should never bark or whine (unless that is their alert), be aggressive, or urinate/defecate in public

Re: Service animals and ESA dogs

sevymt
New Arrival

I have a mixed story.  Most people are kind. My ESAs are well behaved and sometimes people don't even realize I m carrying them.  Most Southwest staff are kind, although you do get the occasional rolling of the eyes. I have been lucky sitting next to passangers who did not mind my dog.  They did not interact with my dog either, which I appreciated. I applaud Southwest for working with people who need Service animals or ESA's.  Thank you. I only had one problem with a Southwest agent, and I believe she was just uneducated.  She tried to tell me my documentation wasn't sufficient because it was from a therapist (licensed) and not an MD.  But once her supervisor educated her, she was agreeable(although grudgingly)  But again, thank you Southwest for being understanding to peoples needs.

Re: Service animals and ESA dogs

mehta440
New Arrival

Hi

 

We are flying first time with an ESA - small poodle. What documentation I need from my doctor or his doctor (vet) to bring with me ? Cost ? Can I keep him in my lap inside the plane? Can he walk freely (with leash) inside the airport and inside the cabin?

 

Thanks a lot,

DM

Re: Service animals and ESA dogs

asdfjkl123098
New Arrival

Hello,

 

My question may have already been answered, but there were quite a few questions and threads, that I'm sure I missed it. If so, sorry.

 

I have a trained service dog for anxiety. Again, he is trained and certified and is NOT an emotional support dog. I have all the info for him, and a vest too, if asked, but my issue is me.

 

I have been diagnosed with PTSD by the VA and recieve disability pay for it. I really do not want to have to go to the VA and ask for a letter and then let everyone in the airport see and read it when I travel. Is the letter from the doctor just for those flying with emotional support dogs? What can I do? I can call to discuss or email privately if needed. 

 

Thanks in advance!

MS

Re: Service animals and ESA dogs

franktravel
Rising Star

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