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Deplaning Process

1horsefan
New Arrival

Southwest has a unique, highly efficient boarding policy, but no particular efficiencies for deplaning.  Deplaning takes up valuable time while passengers wait for everyone to take bags out of the overhead.  The time involved in this process could be reduced significantly for the airline and most passengers if aisle seat passengers would stand and collect their bags after landing, and the entire group of aisle passengers walked off the jet, followed by the group of middle seat and window seat passengers following the same procedure.  

 

I'm interested in your thoughts.

11 REPLIES 11

Re: Deplaning Process

LUVFlier55
New Arrival

The people in the middle seat and window seat towards the front of the plane won't follow it. Too many people traveling as a group that will think they need to be the exception.

 

The boarding process works because they can enforce it. No way to enforce the deplane process.

Re: Deplaning Process

kmlipinski
Active Member

I don't think that would fly.(Pun intended) I would not want to be in a window seat and have to wait for two thirds of the passengers to get off before my row could deplane. Folks would be fighting. As it is, there are some people in the back that run up the aisle as soon as passengers begin to stand. No airline etiquete. 

Safe travels,

 

Re: Deplaning Process

bec102896
Rising Star

Hello

 

i know they were allowing deplaning from the back of the aircraft at some airports such as Burbank I am not sure if it is still done that way or not but it definitely was a quicker way to get off of the plane.

 

i am sure if they tried to make a policy on deplaning it would not be followed as so many people think they are the king or queen and they will try to rush off the plane and some try and run others over.

 

Blake   

Re: Deplaning Process

DancingDavidE
Top Contributor

@bec102896 wrote:

Hello

 

i know they were allowing deplaning from the back of the aircraft at some airports such as Burbank I am not sure if it is still done that way or not but it definitely was a quicker way to get off of the plane.

 

i am sure if they tried to make a policy on deplaning it would not be followed as so many people think they are the king or queen and they will try to rush off the plane and some try and run others over.

 

Blake   


Burbank is the only one that I've been to that does it that way. And they have a terminal replacement plan in the works and will likely have modern jetways in the future instead of the tarmac access with the stairs.

 

Actually they boarded from both ends too. It was a little bit of a pro-tip someone told me that pre-boarders block up the front entrance, go for the rear entry with low A-numbers to try for the exit rows.

Home airport MDW, frequent visitor to MCO to see the mouse.

Re: Deplaning Process

DancingDavidE
Top Contributor

@1horsefan wrote:

Southwest has a unique, highly efficient boarding policy, but no particular efficiencies for deplaning.  Deplaning takes up valuable time while passengers wait for everyone to take bags out of the overhead.  The time involved in this process could be reduced significantly for the airline and most passengers if aisle seat passengers would stand and collect their bags after landing, and the entire group of aisle passengers walked off the jet, followed by the group of middle seat and window seat passengers following the same procedure.  

 

I'm interested in your thoughts.


I think it would be difficult to change the deboarding process, it is pretty well engrained in people to leave the plane as a spot opens up in front of you. A few people mess it up...some are in a hurry for a connection or need the restroom, others put their luggage further back and ended up taking a seat to the front. 

 

I'd need to see mythbusters data that it was actually faster to do it that way, I'm not sure that deplaning the aisles all together will be that much faster than going row-by-row.

Home airport MDW, frequent visitor to MCO to see the mouse.

Re: Deplaning Process

bodhileroc
New Arrival

Your suggestion only works if travelers are traveling alone. Families, business colleagues, groups often sit together and prefer to deplane together in order to avoid confusion once in the terminal. I think a better way to streamline de-planning is to cut down on all the excess overhead baggage. Airlines should charge a fee for carry-ons that require overhead storage; larger overhead bags are what really slow down the process, especially when they are brought on by passengers who really don't have the strength or physical finesse to get them in and out of the overhead efficiently, large bags also slow down the aisle traffic.

Re: Deplaning Process

ffflyer
Active Member

Back in the day the flight attendants would announce, while waiting for the door to open, "Please wait until the Captain has turned off the seat belt sign then jump into the aisle as quickly as you can. Remember, the harder you push the faster you'll get off."

Re: Deplaning Process

gsking
Active Member

As usual, a small consideration by each person would result in a massive benefit to all.  But the average person is somewhere between too stupid to realize this and too selfish to invoke it.

 

All it would take is for each person to not stand and grab their bag until they wouldn't block everyone behind them.  I always wait until the aisle is free to disembark.

So the flip side of this is...don't wait for the people in front of you.  If you can move, go.  Invariably the person you so politely wait for will clog up the aisle grabbing his/her bag or (worse) push back to get it rows back.  So don't give them the opportunity.

 

I think in this case, being ostensibly rude to an individual is actually being polite to everyone.  Unless it's a family with kids, there's no reason they need to disembark together. 

Re: Deplaning Process

WZiel-SWC
New Arrival

I agree making the middle and window seats wait is not a good idea.

I know many times I am held up by those "collecting" their items. Sometimes I try to be "nice" and let someone go but many times even the isle person is still putting items away etc.  Most are not in that big of a hurry to get off the plane.

For me as I sit near the front many times I am held up by discussions in the jetway, people picking up their strollers, and people boarding/waiting for wheelchairs. Wider Jetbridges could help alleviate some of this. Also look at requiring those that are disabled wait in their seat for a wheelchair.  Many times those that can barely walk are out there trying to block the jet bridges and get in their chair.  Last week one of the ladies and her traveling companion were blocking the path discussing if she could go in the chair or not for several minutes. It appeared that they could not "find" her in their order. Maybe give them a wristband or something to scan to make it "faster".