Skip to main content
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Wrapping Up the Skirt Issue

cbarrett1
Not applicable
 Rumor has it that this blog has been kind of busy with comments lately.  Seriously, I know that many of you have posted some pretty passionate comments on the subject of Kyla Ebberts and "traveling attire" in general, and we have been listening.  I thank each of you for sharing your thoughts, and I want you to know that we haven't been skirting the issue. This situation involved a judgment call for sure.  These situations are subjective, and not everyone holds the same opinions.  We serve more than 96 million Customers a year; and every now and then, we'll have a situation that takes on a life of its own.  This was the case here. We always want to apologize if we offend any of our Customers, and we also support our Employees abilities to make decisions.  We are apologizing to Kyla, in typical Southwest style, and I hope you will click here to read about it. Many, many of you on both sides of this issue have asked about a dress code.  We do have a dress code for our Employees who use their travel benefits, but we do not have a dress code for our paying Customers.  Our job is not to be the fashion police; our job is to take care of our Customers and ensure they have a safe flight.  We are proud of our past that included hot pants and we are proud of our future, and I want all of you to be part of that future.
258 Comments
Cygnus
Not applicable
Kim: No, Colleen and company should have STOOD UP for their employee who did nothing wrong, rather than putting their fingers in the wind and deciding to reverse course based on public opinion. What is popular is not always right. What is right is not always popular. I'll still fly Southwest, but I'm bitterly disappointed by Collen's LACK of leadership here.
richard_francis
Not applicable
colleen, i feel the flight attendant who did this should be fired, i saw the outfit on today and athis girl was dressed fine. i have seen worst. as a retired airline employee. travel quite a bit. years ago we had a dress coat, like suit,tie. my airline no longer around. so i purchase real tickets. i also seen web sights and another flt attendant did same thing. also you pick on fat people. what;s with your airline. once again you should fire those employees for giving you all this bad pr. some of ur females flt atten dress in short skirts and tight shorts.
December_star
Not applicable
I have always found once I sit down in my seat it is real hard to see any of the other passengers, let alone what they are wearing. If you all think what this girl was wearing is bad, you obviously don't get out much, trust me there is way worse out there.
Paul__amp__Mary
Not applicable
Is "Keith" a professionally-trained member of the "Fashion Police?" What are his credentials to make subjective decisions about a customer's clothing? Is he imposing his own values (and dress code) on SWA customers? Is he still "at it" or has he (hopefully) learned from this experience? What training and/or policy revisions has SWA undertaken to make sure its employees don't repeat this major customer relations blunder? If I were an SWA investor, I'd be "after the hide" of an employee and his supervisors (including Colleen Barrett) for endangering my investment. My wife and/or I fly SWA regularly (usually, at least once a month, round trip). We choose SWA because of the low prices, frequent flights to our destinations and (usually) friendly and helpful employees (that's feedback for your marketing department.) This incident will not stop us from flying SWA because of the above reasons. I expect that most SWA employees would not have taken the same actions that "Keith" did. However, the incident has diminshed our respect for the airline.
Alicia21
Not applicable
Its sad what some people will do for attention and even sadder what some people believe. If you would have seen excatly how that outfit was worn your thoughts would have been different because it was adjusted different. She just wanted to get attention and get her name known so she would have a shot a playboy or other magazines like that. She just happened to pick on SWA to get a low price. And to compare being afraid to fly because of you might be wearing the wrong color or socks, come on what are you thinking that is a dumb compairson and you know it. Did anyone even she her ranchy myspace? That tells it all. She should be saying sorry to SWA for using them to try to boost her x-rated career and SHAME,SHAME,SHAME on the rest of you for helping her suceed that is being just a bad as she is, like feeding fuel to the fire.
Mike11
Not applicable
In my opinion you should have let her board the plane, but warned her that her outfit was inappriate. I do not like the idea of her hitting the talk show circuit and playing victim. Lots of people get screwed in many different situations. Why didn't she write to a SWA official instead of showing a "who is me" attitude?
SYLVIA_SAMUDIO
Not applicable
I was disappointed to see Southwest didn't stick to their guns on the inappropriate clothing issue. I for one have flown on one flight where a women was so scantily dressed it was embarassing. I mentioned then that Southwest should institute a dress code because some people don't have any sense. I really am tired of seeing peoples underwear. Maybe you should turn the air down so people will have to cover up : )
Tom5
Not applicable
Congrats to the SWA employee for exercising discernment in the best interest of all the customers. The line of decency and propriety for public appearance continually needs to be enforced, and we can't rely on the government or courts to do it. I was on an SWA flight once with a then-famous female actor of Bay Watch. The whole plane erupted in laughter when she came out of the restroom just before landing, having stripped down to a bikini...I guess to make a grand appearance at her destination. If a woman wants to expose her body in public, then she needs to be prepared for public reaction, which in a sensible society, is to encourage her not to do so.
Bob12
Not applicable
What is right is not always popular. What is popular is not always right. I'm disappointed that you bent to the pressure. Take a stand, doggone it, for what is appropriate!
Anonymous2764
Not applicable
I'm glad I had boys! Bu-Bye: Tina
ToddAlllll
Not applicable
Ferguson v. Gies: "The man who goes either by himself or with his family to a public place must expect to meet and mingle with all classes of people. He cannot ask, to suit his caprice or prejudice or social views, that this or that man shall be excluded because he does not wish to associate with them. He may draw his social line as closely as he chooses at his home, or in other private places, but he cannot in a public place carry the privacy of his home with him, or ask that people not as good or great as he is shall step aside when he appears." Unruh Civil Rights Act (California): "All persons within the jurisdiction of this state are free and equal, and no matter what their sex, race, color, religion, ancestry, or national origin are entitled to the full and equal accommodations, advantages, facilities, privileges, or services in all business establishments of every kind whatsoever. This section shall not be construed to confer any right or privilege on a person which is conditioned or limited by law or which is applicable alike to persons of every sex, color, race, religion, ancestry, or national origin." In re Theodore William Cox on Habeas Corpus. California Reporter, 90, 1970, p. 24.: "Neither municipality nor shopping center may exclude individuals who wear long hair or unconventional dress ... merely because of such characteristics." Keep going Corporate America and you will find yourself in Court losing the case. As for the people that post against Kyla and her outfit, I really hate your...perfume, hairspray, bad breath...whatever. Now, can I ask the airline to change that? I think not. Why do you, in all of your prudness, get to have an "offensive" outfit kicked off the flight and I have to smell your bad breath or hear you snore for the next 2 hours? Mind your own business. I have to, to put up with your faults. Right?
Larry6
Not applicable
As a loyal and passionate Southwest customer I was very dismayed by the Kyla Ebbert mini-skirt embarrassment. I was even more dismayed at Coleen Barrett's defense of the employee. If an employee made a mistake, than management should acknowledge the fact and apologize for the company's (employee's) misconduct. If Ms. Ebbert was not arrested for indecent exposure by the police than a Southwest employee should not have inserted his/her own dress code in place of the company's employee operating procedures. An issue like this mocks the very heart of Southwest's "fun" image and it may take a long time for the harm done to be repaired. I give CEO Gary Kelly a lot of credit for coming forward and apologizing in the manor he did for the mistakes that were made by the employee and Ms. Barrett.
Adam_Snider
Not applicable
Having re-read this "apology" several times, I'm not sure that my previous opinion of, "It took a long time, but thanks for finally apologizing" stands. It's written in a flippant manner, and tries to turn the whole incident into a marketing campaign. While I can, to a certain extent, appreciate the "creativity" that was involved in that (I work in marketing), I think it's in poor taste to try to be funny in your apology, and to turn it into a promotional tool. I've flown with SWA in the past, and enjoyed the experience, but I doubt that I'll fly with you again after this.
Joe13
Not applicable
Clear are the differing opinions we've had on what's right and what's wrong and why. My feeling has been that the Southwest employee acted inappropriately. The passenger was wearing something both socially acceptable and common, especially given her age. I can't assume she boarded the plane with any knowledge she was offensive to anyone. Having read through the various comments, I do find that, though my opinion is unchanged, I do respect the differing views, especially of moms (and dads) just trying to raise their kids the best they could. My feeling has become more focused with respect to the passenger being publicly (on the plane and with the knowledge of others) embarrassed than on whether her attire was acceptable or not. As a result, I believe Southwest did the right thing in apologizing. None of us should have to be humiliated because someone else doesn't like something about us. Chances are that there is someone "out there" that doesn't like something about each of us. Chances are, somewhere and at some time, very possibly oblivious to us, we've offended someone. I wouldn't feel bad if a person, for themselves or on behalf of someone else, let me know I've offended someone, even if I had no intention of doing such. What would bother me is if that person acted in a way to embarrass me. I wouldn't want that to happen to me and I don't like seeing it happen to someone else. One writer wrote that men should better respect women - they are our daughters, wives, sisters and mothers (have to read to get proper context and not an exact quote but I get the message). I agree completely. Yet we view the outcome differently. Not only do I have the opinion I do relatve to what happened, but I also have that view out of respect for my similarly aged daughters and how someone might interact with them (no, my daughters do not wear short skirts). The young woman should not have been humiliated and, even if done unintentionally, I feel Southwest acted correctly in making the apology. I'm sure you will teach your children to respect others and not try to embarrass or degrade, especially in the presence of others. Out of respect for those with differing opinions than mine, I would not object to a dress code that resulted in more conservative attire (though this may be very difficult). It's not an issue with me but I would certainly be in favor if it made others more comfortable/less offended without causing a significant infringement on the first group. Then, an individual would know what's acceptable in that setting and could be , if necessary, addressed discretely and courteously, not to mention with more objective basis, befoe he or she is in her or his seat and, like everyone else, just waiting for the plane to take off. Joe
Sean_G
Not applicable
The Ã
Ailea_in_Denver
Not applicable
That's... a pretty lame apology. Not only did you not say that your employee was in the wrong and did not say what, if any, actions were going to be taken, but you classlessly used it as a marketing gimmick. Poor form, bad taste, and possibly more embarrassing to the girls who your employees harassed to top it off. Great job, there, guys. Humor not appreciated. You do not have a dress code and allowing any employee to enforce someone else's idea of what is appropriate is disgusting. I don't dress in skirts at all, but if I did - who gets to say if my thigh to knee length is appropriate or if I should be forced to wear it at mid calf or *gasp* if showing those scandalous ankles would just distress the person next to me too badly. Apologize with a little splash of sincerity, please. And fire the next employee who decides to partake in a little "slut-shaming" publicly with your fabulous marketing strategies. I like flying with you. I won't until you take a solid stand on this.
Steve26
Not applicable
At first when I heard the story, I thought the ops agent overreacted. But now learning all the facts, I believe SWA should have backed their employees instead of backing down. She was on the today show showing off her outfit and how it wasn't showing any skin, yet when she went to sit back down, it showed everything. They even had to blur it. Secondly, from the ops agent, she wasn't wearing that sweater either. Here's another example of someone trying to exploit others for their own profit. People ask "how can SWA treat their customers that way?" First off, SWA doesn't need customers like that. Secondly, by doing nothing, they would have let down other customers on the flight, especially young children. SWA might be the Walmart of the airline industry, but that doesn't mean it always has to put up with trailer park trash, someone has to draw the line somewhere. To really see what kind of person she is, check out her myspace website before it was replaced by a more conservative one after the incident.
A_smart_feminis
Not applicable
Ah, apologizing in typical Southwest style. Does that mean snarky and flippant? Because that's what this press release was. The original situation of some lone, apparently easily scandalized flight attendant passing fashion and moral judgments on a young woman was, in my opinion, offensive. But to respond with a joke is even more offensive to me. I can write off one person's actions, but this press release, as the voice of the company, proves a party line and a corporate environment I want nothing to do with (especially since they, apparently, want nothing to do with me). I even called the PR office number listed at on the press release and was treated dismissively and patronizingly. I am a longtime Southwest flier who will never fly Southwest again. I was considering it after the initial incident but this press release sealed the deal. Shameful.
Madeleine
Not applicable
Yes, this faux apology clinched it for me. I will not be flying Southwest in future either for business or pleasure. A genuine apology would have made a difference. But this apology mocks the victim and exploits her degradation to push Southwest's lower fares. As a customer and businesswoman who cares about the bottom line, it is nonetheless not worth it to me to sell out women's right to basic respect just to save a few bucks on air fare. There are some comments on here that applaud the Southwest employees desire to promote modesty. But there was no modesty rule or dress code on Southwest airlines, and it was inappropriate for the employee to decide that his personal subjective judgment as to another adult's attire was the appropriate standard. The victim's Myspace page is also completely irrelevant; even if the employee had known about her myspace page (which I am sure he didn't), it would not change the fact that she has a right to be respected by customer service professionals.
Eric_Hoffarth
Not applicable
Greetings, After viewing an upcoming episode of The Dr. Phil Show, I believe the character of the young lady reveals more than her clothing, and that is revealing indeed. If anyone noticed her appearance on the Today Show with Matt Lauer, he seemed to be favoring her side of the issue as she was wearing the exact clothing she was wearing on the flight in question. Did anyone notice that the Today Show deliberately edited her skir in such a was so as to "wash out" an area of her skirt as she was standing so her panties (?) were not broadcast on camera. If it was inappropriate for television as arguably permissive as television broadcasting is these days, is it not also fair to suggest the Southwest employees were correct in censoring the live image of the same to its other passengers. While I understand Southwest's response and apology due to the realities of customer relations, perhaps taking a stand would be admired if the extra effort for standing up for conscientious policies and principles means individuals displaying bad behavior aren't reinforced for it. Nonetheless, Southwest hasn't lost a customer, but I would have supported the company whole heartedly had they stood by their employee and company policy in this case.
Madeleine1
Not applicable
I will no longer be flying on Southwest Airlines. In the past, I have enjoyed good service and low fares. After this event though, I refuse to give SWA any more of my money. Although they claim to have no dress code, they harassed a paying customer and tried to stop her from flying. This is not the only woman who has been harassed by a SWA employee, and I'm sure it won't be the last. SWA's "apology" is disgusting, filled with sexist remarks. It is very clear from SWA's statement that they do not care at all about the complaints. They do not care at all that they made a mistake. As for the people making judgments about this young woman-stop. In America, we have the freedom to decide what we want to wear. Are you really suggesting that we start having laws on what is considered appropriate attire-for adults? I don't care if this woman dressed skimpily, I don't care if she is "trashy" or what, I care that she was treated horribly and was discriminated against. That is not acceptable. Southwest, you are truly pathetic. -one more ex-Southwest passenger
Amy26
Not applicable
Nice "apology." Regardless of who was right or wrong in the first place, this apology is one of the most offensive things I've ever seen anyone in corporate America put forward. Southwest is off my list, and if I have my way, no one in my organization will fly Southwest again, either, regardless of fare.
Anonymous777
Not applicable
I checked out her myspace page. It's easy to find if you just search on her name. She isn't even that good looking in some of those photos. She created her myspace this month. It seems like she is just looking for publicity, and the news media gave it to her. Do I think the Southwest employee acted inappropriately? Well, yes, I do. I personally don't care what people wear. I worked as a hotel receptionist for almost three years. The only thing I cared about was whether or not our customers could pay their bills. Kyla has went way beyond her 15 minutes of fame. This seems like a cheap way to get some attention. Perhaps, she is trying to get into _Playboy_ or something?
Jon7
Not applicable
Kyla denied Colleens (jealous of Kyla) and Gary (i'm a perv) apology! Now, I am tired of Kyla's media attention at this point. But it's nice to know that she refused Collens (wish she could wear skirts without varicose veins showing), and Garys (wish i wasn't married) bribe. Make fun of Kyla all you want, but Collen and Gary showed that they are the real "sluts".
Maria3
Not applicable
Does Southwest not understand the meaning of an apology? This is offensive in so many ways, from mocking Kyla to trying to capitalize on the harassment of the airline staff. I will not be flying Southwest again unless a REAL apology is issued and this one retracted.
Dia_Montgomery
Not applicable
Some have said weÃ
Deidre_Sawyer
Not applicable
Kuddos to Southwest and their handling of this situation. I have always been pleased with their service compared to the other airlines. The people who said they won't fly Southwest.. I have one thing to say....Good Riddance!
Pencils
Not applicable
The first time I flew Southwest, I was appalled when I found out they treated their customers like cattle in chutes in the name of saving a few bucks. Funny how JetBlue doesn't need to do that. I put them to the bottom of my choices for flying in the future, and luckily, have never needed to fly Southwest again. Now, I find out that Southwest mocks their customers! They humiliated two of their female customers, and instead of truly apologizing, they mocked them in "funny" press releases. Of course this is only to counteract any lawsuits, but I don't care. I expect basic human respect from companies that I patronize. It's not much to ask for, especially from an airline. I'm NEVER going to fly Southwest again. I'll pay a few more bucks and fly an airline that has treated me well, like JetBlue. Besides, after reading their response to this, their management strikes me as so stupid I'm surprised they can keep their planes in the air.
Sophie1
Not applicable
I'd like to second all the comments censuring SWA for its despicable paternalism and vowing never to fly with you again.
Rudy
Not applicable
Why don't you you freaks petition SWA to change their name to Jesus world airlines. I think it's ridiculous to take issue with someone because of their attire. Just please stop it. You can't continue to "childproof" everything by punishing adults. So your kid sees some breast ,big deal. You think you're protecting them from nudity while still exposing them to hours of questionable TV or video games,and feel smug when someone chatises a young woman who is minding her own business,and wearing what she chooses. Good job folks!
Allison1
Not applicable
I for one just think this is disgusting. I didn't realize that the pilots on SW are now all of our fathers, telling us what we can wear when we get on a plane. I just find it absolutely unreal. As a grown adult woman, I will wear whatever I want and by the way I won't fly with an airline that feels the need to treat me like a child and neither will the company I work for anymore on our business trips. I've already talked to the HR people and they've decided SW doesn't reflect the company sexual harassment policies, so SW won't be getting our business anymore.
Elizabeth_Gish
Not applicable
I can't believe that instead of a sincere apology, your company wrote this woman a fake apology and then named a promotion after it - clearly you are somehow thinking this is good PR? Mini-skirt fare? Give me a break. I have decided that I will never fly Southwest no matter what. I can't believe how poorly this was handled. You all should be ashamed of yourselves.
Arellis
Not applicable
"As a SWA family member and frequent flyer at swa, good for you flight crew. I am personally tired of having to turn the other way because I accidentally looked over and saw the woman with the ( new meaning ) cut off shorts and saw her buisness without undies. Or the woman who is on a full family flight out of Orlando to Providence in a tube top, thatÃ
Vivita
Not applicable
Here are some myspace page photos of that paragon of ladylike virtue and behavior /s: http://i8.tinypic.com/5yk43us.gif http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v251/xXxKylaxXx/Pictures405.jpg http://72.14.209.104/search?q=cache:http://www.myspace.com/PrincessKyla Meanwhile, to all those who bluff that they are quitting Southwest, all I can say is enjoy your higher fares and Soviet-style service on alternative airlines. Can't wait for one of you to sign up for a USAir flight. Last one I got on, they cancelled without notice as I arrived at the airport, claimed it was bad weather in a distant city, forced me to wait another whole night with huge luggage I'd dragged across a city and was exhausted from, refused to hold it for the night, gave me a crummy lying lecture on 'federal homeland security regulations' (as if stinking terrorists can predict weather and know to strike when there is bad weather in a distant city, yeah sure) and to top it off, gave zero, repeat, absolutely zero, apology, and not even an apologetic smile, just the nasty Soviet service that would have put Aeroflot circa 1972 to shame. I can't wait for one of you to get on one of those USAir flights at double the price instead of Southwest. It warms the cockles of my heart. In reality, I smell bluffing and know plenty will be back. Up until now, the only thing you needed to be sure to not do, other than join alqaida, was show up without wearing panties and parading your bare belly. Now with this Southwest apology, you don't even have to do that anymore, you can go as pantiless as you like and flash that belly so what's not to like. Meantime, enjoy your Soviet service on the dinosaur airlines of your choice.
Mystery
Not applicable
After all this (too late) Colleen says SW is not the "fashion police" ??? . I think her employees need some training about keeping their fanatical thinking and opinions to themselves. What they've done is just open up a can of worms that will cause some passengers to dress even more offending. In turn those that feel offended should express this concern to Southworst and demand free tickets for their senses being offended. This would include middle-aged, elderly and parents of teenagers and small children.
prc
Not applicable
What a ridiculous load of crap. I agree with Elizabeth above- spinning an apology into a promotion is sad, sad, sad. I was a dedicated customer for quite some time, but frankly, I'm taking my business elsewhere in light of this debacle. Unless, of course, a serious effort to fix the matter is attempted, but I'm not optimistic. So long, Southwest. Best of luck on your puritan airways. I'm out.
Frequent_Flyer9
Not applicable
KUDOS SOUTHWEST! Attire like Kyla's needs to be confined to Hooters, not an airplane cabin. Nobody wants to see your bodacious ta-ta's while enjoying the delicious peanuts. She is a spoiled brat and needs to get over herself. Looking to get rich by suing Southwest, SHAME! Then ya'll will moan and groan when fares go up....
Alicia10
Not applicable
If only you had seen the way she was really dressed
Randy7
Not applicable
It's obvious an organized attack by a bunch of angry feminist that don't even fly Southwest is trying to sway the argument on the blog. Very lame attempt ladies. Since this whole affair is silly and childish Southwest doesn't owe Kyla anything. She wasn't denied flying on the plane, and only asked to adjust her clothing. I've had much worse things said and done to me during my life, and never hired a lawyer, or threw a tantrum like Kyla. For a 23 year old women she needs to grow up and learn to handle some criticism instead of acting like a crybaby. For those who claim Southwest is mocking and making fun of Kyla all I have to say is you've got to be kidding. Have you seen her appearances on the Today Show, Geraldo, and Ellen? From what I saw even her supporters are mocking and making fun of her. Southwests apology and promotion fit right in with the three ring circus Kyla has created and is promoting to draw attention to herself. For a women so traumatized by Southwests actions she sure appears to be having a good time and enjoying every minute of it. I believe she hates letting it go and wants to keep the charade going as long as possible. Can you say attention whore. The only one who should be ashamed is Kyla Ebbert.
Marissa1
Not applicable
Southwest, you should be ashamed of yourselves! First, you decide to humiliate a customer by imposing a dress code that did not exist. I originally thought this might have a single employee acting out of line to police and harass customers. Then we learn this is not the only time a customer has been harassed for her clothing as a second customer came forward. Again there was no prior dress code in place to justify any of this harassment. But THEN, to drive it all home, rather than actually apologize for these outrageous employees who harass their customers, you create a false "apology" as a promotional stunt and publicly pronounce your outright sexism!! Apparently there may be no pre-established company policy on appropriate dress, but it is clear that you build your company policy around sexism and sexual harassment! You have lost many customers, including myself and everyone I know.
e_carrillo
Not applicable
Perhaps the flight attendant just thought she was a little cold.
DM_Rauch
Not applicable
I'd like the miniskirt fare for both my husband and myself in addition to any senior citizen discount..... but I am certain that if he approached the boarding area in a mini-skirt that we would have a new media Ã
Laurie9
Not applicable
It's really a shame, because I've always thought of Southwest as having a progressive corporate ethic and have tried to fly SW whenever possible. After this incident? Never again. The level of willful idiocy is breathtaking.
Louise4
Not applicable
Unfortunately what Southwest failed to explain was that the girl had her skirt unbuttoned halfway up and was not wearing underwear. Furthermore, other passengers had complained and the flight attendants had no other choice but to address it. Southwest should never have apologized to her in the first place, if she was embarrassed then perhaps she should dress appropriately. On behalf of the many passengers who would prefer not to look at someone's private parts while they fly with their children (or anytime for that matter) I applaud Southwest. For those who won't fly them because of this, thank you, because if you agree with this girl then I probably don't want to see your outfit either. People should try taking some responsibility for their actions and have respect for themselves and for others, if they won't do that then good for Southwest for doing it for them.
Francisco_Delga1
Not applicable
LET'S ALL DEFEND SOMEONE WITH THE BRAINS THE SIZE OF MY PINKY AND WHOSE ONLY HOPE IN LIFE IS TO WORK AT HOOTERS AND MODEL FOR PLAYBOY. WHAT A REAL WINNER.. I RATHER DEFEND AN AIRLINE WHO CHARGES LOW FARES, WHO HAS SUPPORTED OUR TROOPS AND OUR COMMUNITIES AND WHO HAS GIVEN AMERICANS THE FREEDOM TO FLY SINCE THE '70'S FRANCISCO
Tiffany
Not applicable
To address some of the responses above- I think its a sad commentary on our society that people are condemning Southwest for their good judgment. It clearly demonstrates the depths to which standards in this country have dropped. I'm embarrassed for all the people who are writing to say that Southwest is being "the fashion police," they are clearly missing the point of the issue. Shame on them for being that ignorant. I'm actually appalled that any adult would have the audacity to stick up for this girl.
nsx
Not applicable
Louise wrote (Sept. 18 7:29AM): >Unfortunately what Southwest failed to explain was that the girl had her skirt unbuttoned halfway up and was not wearing underwear. Furthermore, other passengers had complained and the flight attendants had no other choice but to address it. This would explain the original incident, but can you then explain (a) why Southwest wouldn't reveal this exculpatory information in support of the crew, and (b) how Kyla could have been so sure that Southwest wouldn't blow her cover, so to speak, that she could afford to start a PR offensive to increase her public exposure? Of the two of these, item (a) bothers me more. Especially because Southwest supposedly puts its Employees above all else. Supposedly. Item (b) could be explained by too much myspace between the ears, I suppose. We all know that some people make strange choices. In summary, even if Louise is correct, there's still something major missing here. The facts don't add up, and I'm sure they will once we know the whole story. Southwest: it's time to put the facts on the table. All of them. Back your employees if they were right and reprimand them if they were not, but don't give us any cutesy evasions.
Robbie3
Not applicable
I agree with the last poster. I travel frequently for work, and while I appreciate a good-looking girl in a short skirt as much as the next guy, this clearly crossed the line. She wasnÃ
Joel
Not applicable
I wholeheartedly agree with Vivita, Debra and many other people on this page who have voiced approval of Southwest's actions. Before I continue, let me say that I am a young heterosexual male and I am far from conservative and prudish. I am also a regular Southwest customer. I enjoy looking at attractive women as much as any other person. However, inappropriate is inappropriate. Let's face it, Kyla is only being considered a victim, because many people consider her to be attractive. And let's be honest, attractive women have been allowed to wear whatever they want, wherever they want for a long time. Let's consider the following: As Vivita states, what would have happened if Kyla had been a plus-size man or woman? What if she were say...50+ years of age? Most likely, she would have been kicked off the plane for showing 'a little too much skin' and it wouldn't have even made the news. More than likely, the same people who are crying foul over this incident would have been applauding the action...particularly if it had been a man. "Ugh...what was (she or he) thinking?" They would have said. "No one wants to see THAT!". Do you think that a man wearing short 'Richard Simmons' shorts would have been allowed to board the plane? And God forbid that any man were wearing shorts that accidentally hung open and showed part of his...gasp...underwear. That man would have been escorted off the plane and into police custody in no time. Again, that story would probably not have been newsworthy, because no one would consider that person to be a victim. And what about the disparity between what is considered appropriate for women and men? I see women walking the streets in 'work out shorts' that are shorter and tighter than my boxer briefs. How long would it take me to get arrested for walking the streets in my boxer briefs?...Even if I look like Brad Pitt. Women are allowed to wear sleeveless shirts, tank tops and shorts to work, while men are sent home for wearing pants that look too casual. How many male office workers are allowed to wear shorts to work? Not many. Let's not even get into the whole issue of how attractive women are encouraged by society to flash their panties and private parts in public. Heaven forbid any man wears any short that fall above the knee...look he's showing (gasp) leg!!! Inappropriate clothing rules need to be enforced and it needs to be enforced uniformly...regardless of gender, attractiveness and age. Most women I've heard complaining about Southwest's actions admit that they wouldn't want THEIR daughter to dress that way and board a plane. So what makes it okay for Kyla to dress they way she did and get aboard a plane? Until society begins to send a message that it is not acceptable for people to dress a certain way in public, we will continue to have young girls looking up to Paris and Britney....yes, even your daughter. Again, I applaud Southwest for it's actions and agree with others who believe that Kyla is owed no apology. I've never been more proud to be a Southwest customer. And for those persons who are crying foul because they believe they should be able to wear whatever they want anyplace...welcome to a world with rules.
Matt21
Not applicable
Independent of how the skirt issue was handled - poor move on the marketing campaign. Your campaign has brought me to this comment, instead of checking out the fares your offering. Missed the mark.